3.5.19

review and cover mani: heroine


The back jacket description, from Goodreads:

An Amazon Best Book of the Month! A captivating and powerful exploration of the opioid crisis—the deadliest drug epidemic in American history—through the eyes of a college-bound softball star. Edgar Award-winning author Mindy McGinnis delivers a visceral and necessary novel about addiction, family, friendship, and hope. 

When a car crash sidelines Mickey just before softball season, she has to find a way to hold on to her spot as the catcher for a team expected to make a historic tournament run. Behind the plate is the only place she’s ever felt comfortable, and the painkillers she’s been prescribed can help her get there.

The pills do more than take away pain; they make her feel good.

With a new circle of friends—fellow injured athletes, others with just time to kill—Mickey finds peaceful acceptance, and people with whom words come easily, even if it is just the pills loosening her tongue.

But as the pressure to be Mickey Catalan heightens, her need increases, and it becomes less about pain and more about want, something that could send her spiraling out of control.


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HEROINE came in hot. The opening sentence of “When I wake up, all my friends are dead,” set a tone that initially scared me off, but I’m happy I came back around because while HEROINE was a heavy read, it also had the signature Mindy McGinnis flare for tackling tough subjects with an unflinching perspective. No surprise McGinnis was up to the task because, well, have you read her other books? *peers over glasses with cocked eyebrow*


Jacket art © 2019 by plainpicture/fstop/Dual Dual
Jacket design by Erin Fitzsimmons


Mickey, determined and focused to get a scholarship for softball, was up against the clock to recover from her injuries in order to play in her final high school softball season, which immediately set the stage for her impending addiction. Because while Mickey’s initial goal of healing quickly had her popping pills, the euphoria of pharmaceutically induced happiness got Mickey hooked. As her addiction progressed, HEROINE became a master’s class in tracing a user’s rationalization process; the twisting and contorting of facts in order justify taking higher doses. Casting Mickey’s mother as a nurse doubled-down on the idea of how easy it is to fall into addiction and while I turned each page, transfixed, I dreaded when the prologue would circle back around. With McGinnis’s reputation for bleaker endings, I honestly didn’t know if Mickey would make it out alive.




While HEROINE is fiction, it also isn’t. And while it follows Mickey’s descent in to addiction, it’s also a story about friendship, sports, and just enough hope to keep you going. But above all else, if you get to the end and aren’t furious with big pharma, you’ve missed the point. These drugs are real and they steal lives. Prescribing such highly addictive painkillers to anybody, especially teenagers, is irresponsible and immoral. There’s no way to predict if that first pill will become the first step down a long road of addiction, which means they shouldn’t exist in the first place. Leave it to Mindy McGinnis to shine a compassionate light in the darkest of places. Deeply uncomfortable and entirely necessary, HEROINE had better win some awards, and should be required reading in schools. Five stars plus one million stars, for a grand total of one million and five stars. 


Big thanks to HCC Frenzy for a gifted ARC!



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For this mani, I used:

FingerPaints – Paper Mache and Black Expressionism

China Glaze – Street Style Princess

OPI – matte topcoat

So Nailicious – needle and warrior brushes


1 comment:

  1. You nailed this cover. I so need to get back in to reading. I have been slacking at reading book lately. I have been reading the same kids book over and over to my daughter.

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